Visit Reykjavik for the Unique Þorri Midwinter Feast!

Cheers from the Reykjavik Beer Tour

You may think January is the first month of the year, but, if you visit Reykjavik now, you will see we also recognize that this is the fourth month of winter. If you follow the old Norse calendar, the end of January is usually the beginning of Þorri. This is when we Icelanders rejoice that winter is half-way and show off our heritage in song and food.  

Your Friend in Reykjavik would love to show you how this is a perfect time of year to enjoy traditional Iceland. And try some of our more unique local delicacies! 

What is Þorri?

The Þ in Þorri is pronounced “th”, as in “Thor”, so there are some that say that this is the month we celebrate Þór (yes, Thor!). But there is more to this mid-winter festival than the god of thunder. Others will say that this is a tribute to a more ancient winter deity, or even a powerful king of old. Whatever the origins, we embrace all things Iceland, from quirky customs to unimaginable (perhaps for you) meals.

This midwinter season usually begins around the 24th of January and ends around the 22nd of February. The first day is known as Bóndadagur, or Man’s Day, and ends with Konudagur, Woman’s Day.

What happens on Man’s Day? Woman’s Day?

Good question! These days are also known as Husband’s and Wife’s Days as they traditionally celebrated the heads of households, man and woman. While Woman’s Day is a little more understandable as we give flowers or presents to the important ladies in our lives, Man’s Day is a little odder. We still offer little gifts as well, but there is a custom calling for the man of the house, on the morning of Man’s Day, to put on only one leg of his pants and run outside and call his neighbors. (If you join us for a folklore walk on Bóndadagur, we make no promises that you’ll see this, but it will be an enjoyable walk nonetheless!)

Þorri feast
Ready to sample some Icelandic delicacies during Þorri? (Source: The blanz, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons)

And a Þorrablót Feast?

The highlight of Þorri is Þorrablót, which is a feast of traditional Icelandic foods. Some of these delicious morsels you can get all year round, but during this time of year, you can find them in a lot more places. Now, we say delicious, but you may need to have an adventurous palate to try some of our delicacies. 

You will get to try such unique dishes as blóðmör, ram’s stomach stuffed with congealed sheep‘s blood, svið, boiled sheep‘s head, and, who can forget, hákarl, fermented shark. There is also plenty of beer and Brennivin (our schnapps also called Black Death). And menus will include more recognizable foods for those who want to stick to a less traditional menu!

Your Friend in Reykjavik is ready to celebrate Þorri with you!

Whether you make it for Þorri or not, Your Friend in Reykjavik is ready to take you on a culinary journey of Iceland with our Reykjavik food tour. From fermented shark to our more “normal” and yet distinctively Icelandic hot dogs, we will make sure you know what Iceland tastes like while sharing the best that Reykjavik has to offer!

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